Gwalior - Gwalior Tour

Rajasthani Women

    

Gwalior

Welcome

Rajasthan Tours

31 Days Rajasthan Tour
28 Days Rajasthan Heritage Tour
24 Days Forts and Palaces Tour
19 Days Rajasthan & North India
18 Days Rajasthan Round Trip
17 Days Rajasthan Vacations

17 Days Rajasthan Tour
17 Days Rajasthan Palace Tour
16 Days Rural Rajasthan Tour
16 Days Rajasthan With Pushkar
16 Days Cultural Rajasthan Tour
15 Days Hadoti Tour
 
14 Days Rajasthan Heritage Tour
14 Days Rajasthan Short Tour
14 Days Rajasthan and Goa
13 Days Rajasthan Holidays
13 Days Honeymoon Tour
13 Days Desert Tour
 
12 Days Rajasthan Desert Tour
11 Days Wild Life Tour
11 Days Shekhawati Desert Tour
11 Days Rajasthan Tour
11 Days Golden Triangle & caves
10 Days Rajasthan Desert Triangle
 
10 Days Rajasthan and Agra Tour
8 Days Taj Mahal Tour
8 Days Taj Mahal and Wildlife
8 Days Rajputana Tour
8 Days Triangle with Mandawa
8 Days Delhi-Jaipur-Agra Tour
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
Introduction of Gwalior

Gwalior City is a District in Madhya Pradesh State near Âgra. The new section of the city called Lashkar. Lashkar is few miles South from the old city. It is the site of factories producing cotton, yarn, paint, ceramics, chemicals, and leather products. The nucleus of Gwalior is a citadel crowning an isolated rock about 91 m (300 ft) high, 3.2 km (2 mi) long, and 823 m (2700 ft) wide. The rock is said to have been a strong hold for more than Ten Centuries and Old city is located in the Eastern base of the rock. The old city is covered with white sandstone Mosque, Palaces, rock temples and statues of archaeological and architectural interest. The Jiwaji University was built in Gwalior in the year 1964. Gwalior City was the Capital of the princely State of Gwalior until 1948 and the summer Capital of Madhya Bharat State from 1948 to 1956. When Madhya Bharat became part of Madhya Pradesh, it become separate District.


Gwalior Fort

Gwalior's history is traced back to a legend in 8th century AD when a chief tain known as Suraj Sen was struck by a deadly disease and cured by a hermit-saint Gwalipa. As a gratitude for that incidence, he founded this city by his name. The new city of Gwalior became existance over the centuries. The cradle of great dynasties ruled the city Gwalior. With different Dynasty, the city gained a new dimension from the warrior kings, poets, musicians, and saints who contributed to making it renowned throughout the country. The city is also the setting for the memorials of freedom fighters such as Tatya Tope and the indomitable Rani of Jhansi. Today the old settings stand side by side with the trappings of modernity.

History of  Gwalior

According to a legend, Gwalior derives its name from a great sage Gwalipa who cured a chief of the Kachwaha clan suffering from leprosy.

Gwalior's strategic position between north and south India made it an important possession and was captured by several ruling houses. The first historical holders of the city were the Huns. Between 11th to 14th century AD, Gwalior came under the influence of Kachwaha Rajputs, the Pratiharas, Qutub-ud-din Aibak, and Iltutmish, and remained under Muslim possession until 1398. Under the Tomars, whose most important king was Man Singh (1486-1517), Gwalior rose to prominence. Gwalior was finally surrendered to Ibrahim Lodhi in 1518. Held in succession by the Mughals, Jats, Marathas and the British, Gwalior was finally handed over to Jiyaji Rao Scindia at a formal durbar in 1885. The Scindias were the last ruling family of Gwalior and are still influential in the political arena of India.

Today, the city is also famous for the educational institutions like Indian Institute of Information Technology and Management, Indian Institute of Travel and Tourism Management, Scindia School, and Laxmibai National Institute of Physical Education attracting students from every nook and corner of the country.

 
Tourist Attraction in Gwalior

The Fort
Standing on a steep mass of sandstone, Gwalior Fort dominates the city and is its most significant monument. It has been the scene of momentous events, imprisonment, battles and jauhars. A steep road winds upwards to the fort, flanked by statues of the Jain tirthankaras, carved into the rock face. The magnificent outer walls of the fort still stand, two miles in length and 35 feet high, bearing witness to its reputation for being one of the most invincible forts of India. This imposing structure inspired Emperor Babur to describe it as " the pearl amongst the fortresses of Hind ".

Gujari Mahal

Within the fort are some marvels of medieval architecture. The 15th century Gujari Mahal is a monument to the love of Raja Mansingh Tomar for his intrepid Gujar Queen, Mrignayani. The outer structure of Gujari Mahal has survived in an almost total state of preservation; the interior has been converted into Archaeological Museum housing rare antiquities,some of them dating back to the 1st century A.D. Even though many of these have been defaced by the iconoclastic Mughals , their perfection of form has survived the ravages of time. Particularly worth seeing is the statue of Shalbhanjika from Gyraspur, the tree goddess, the epitome of perfection in miniature . The statue is kept in the custody of the museum's curator, and can be seen on request.

Man Mandir Palace

Man Mandir Palace was constructed by Raja Mansingh between 1486 and 1517. The tiles that once decorated its exterior have not survived, but the traces of these tiles still remain at the entrance of the palace. Vast chambers with fine stone screens were once the music halls, and behind these screens, the royal ladies would learn music from the great masters of the day. Below, circular dungeons housed the state prisoners of the Mughals. Emperor Aurangzeb had his brother , Murad imprisoned , and later executed here. Close by is Jauhar Pond, where in the Rajput tradition, the Ranis committed mass sati after their consorts had been defeated in battle. At Man Mandir Palace, a poignant ambience of those days of chivalry and heroism still lingers in the silent chambers. A superbly mounted Son-et-Lumiere here brings it all alive every evening.

Ghaus Mohammed's Tomb
The sandstone mausoleum of the Afghan prince, Ghaus Mohammed, is also designed on early Mughal lines. Particularly exquisite are the screens which use the pierced stone technique as delicate as lace. It is on the way to Gwalior fort near Hazira from Railway Station.
 

Sculptures

Gujari Mahal

Gwalior Fort

Ghaus Mohammed Tomb

Gwalior Fort

Gwalior Fort

Gurudwara Data Bandhi Chhod
Built in the memory of Guru Hargobind Saheb , the 6th Sikh Guru who was imprisoned here by Emperor Jehangir for over two years. It is located on the Gwalior Fort.
Distance from Railway Station / Bus Stand : 6.00 Kms Approx.

Tomb of Tansen
This is the tomb of the father of Hindustani classical music, the great Mian Tansen, one of the 'Nine Jewels' of Emperor Akbar's court. It is built in the early Mughal architectural style and is surrounded by lush gardens in typical Mughal style. There is a tamarind tree near the tomb. It is believed that Tansen got fabulous voice after eating leaves of this tree so people visiting the place also eat these leaves.

Jai Vilas Palace and Museum
A splendor of a different kind exists in the Jai Vilas Palace, current residence of the Scindia family. Some 25 rooms have been turned into the Jivaji Rao Scindia Museum, and in these rooms , so evocative of a regal lifestyle, that the past comes alive. Jai Vilas is a
n Italianate structure which combines the Tuscan and Corinthian architectural modes.

The imposing Darbar Hall has two central chandeliers weighing a couple of tones, and hung only after ten elephants had tested the strength of the roof. Ceilings picked out in gilt, heavy draperies and tapestries , fine Persian carpets and antique furniture from France and Italy are the features of these spacious rooms.

 

Jai Vilas Palace

Scindia School

Darbar Jai Vilas Palace

Teli Ka Mandir

Gurudwara Data Bandhi Chhod

Tomb of Tansen

How to Reach Gwalior

By Air
Gwalior is connected by Indian Airlines to Bombay, Bhopal, Indore, and Delhi.

By Rail:
Gwalior is on the main Delhi-Bombay and Delhi-Madras rail link. Among major trains, the Taj and Shatabdi Express connect Gwalior with Delhi and Agra. Gwalior is well linked with Agra (118 km), Mathura, Jaipur (350 km), Delhi (321 km), Lucknow, Bhopal (423 km), Chanderi (239 km), Indore (486 km), Jhansi (101 km), Khajuraho (275 km), Ujjain (455 km), and Shivpuri (114 km).

By Road:
The most common and cheapest way of moving around the city is the six-seater auto-rickshaws. Taxis are also available so are mini buses.

You will visit “Gwalior” during the below Tour of Rajasthan.

Delightful Rajasthan and North India Tour (Group Tour) (Including Gwalior)
20 Days / 19 Nights
Delhi - Mandawa - Bikaner - Jaisalmer - Osian - Jodhpur - Ranakpur - Udaipur - Pushkar - Jaipur - Fatehpur Sikri - Agra - Gwalior - Orchha - Khajuraho - Varanasi - Delhi

 
 

Group Tours

Car Rental

 
 
:: Home :: email :: Chat  :: Contact :: Enquiry :: About us :: Site Map :: Links

www.rajasthanvisit.com  
Copyright © rajasthanvisit team. All Rights Reserved.